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Building collapses in Spain's Palma de Mallorca, killing at least 4 people

Medics take injured people away from a building that collapsed in Palma de Mallorca, Spain, Thursday May 23, 2024. (Isaac Buj / Europa Press via AP) Medics take injured people away from a building that collapsed in Palma de Mallorca, Spain, Thursday May 23, 2024. (Isaac Buj / Europa Press via AP)
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MADRID -

A two-storey restaurant building collapsed on the beach in Palma de Mallorca on Thursday, killing at least four people and injuring 16 people in the tourism hot spot in Spain's Balearic Islands, the country's national police said.

Seven people were injured "very seriously" and nine were seriously injured, emergency services said on the X social media platform. They were taken to various hospitals in Palma.

Firefighters and police forces rushed to the scene, emergency services said, adding some psychologists had been called in.

According to emergency services, the roof of the building collapsed.

Medics take injured people away from a building that collapsed in Palma de Mallorca, Spain, Thursday, May 23, 2024. (Isaac Buj / Europa Press via AP)

"I am closely following the consequences of the terrible collapse that occurred on the beach of Palma," Prime Minister Pedro Sanchez said on X.

Sanchez said he had spoken to local and regional authorities, adding the government is ready to help "with all the means and troops that are necessary."

"I want to send my condolences to the families of the deceased and my wish for a speedy recovery to the injured," he said.

Spanish state-owned broadcaster TVE showed firefighters working to clear areas of the Medusa Beach Club in Palma around 11:30 p.m. local time, and ambulances on the scene.

(Reporting by Pietro Lombardi; Editing by Jonathan Oatis, Sonali Paul, Chris Reese and Richard Chang)

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