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Russia's claim of Mariupol's capture fuels concern for POWs

Concern mounted Saturday over the fate of the Ukrainian fighters who became Moscow's prisoners as Russia claimed seizure of the steel plant-turned-fortress in Mariupol, capping a nearly three-month siege that left the strategic port city in ruins and more than 20,000 city residents feared dead.

In this photo provided by Azov Special Forces Regiment of the Ukrainian National Guard Press Office, a Ukrainian soldier stands inside the ruined Azovstal steel plant prior to surrender to the Russian forces in Mariupol, Ukraine, May 19, 2022. (Dmytro Kozatski/Azov Special Forces Regiment of the Ukrainian National Guard Press Office via AP)

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Who were Mariupol's last defenders?

The Ukrainian forces who made a determined last stand in a Mariupol steel mill against Russian troops were a mixture of seasoned soldiers, border guards, a controversial national guard regiment and volunteers who took up arms in the weeks before Russia's invasion. Here's a look at these Ukrainian forces, who were taken prisoner by the Russians as they left the plant, and what they accomplished.

Ukrainian servicemen sit in a bus after leaving Mariupol's besieged Azovstal steel plant, near a penal colony, in Olyonivka, in territory under the government of the Donetsk People's Republic, eastern Ukraine, May 20, 2022. (AP Photo)

Russian vodka, caviar and diamonds on new Canadian sanctions list

Foreign Minister Melanie Joly announced a fresh wave of sanctions against Vladimir Putin's regime on Friday including a ban on importing Russian vodka, caviar and diamonds. The ban on the import of certain luxury goods from Russia will tighten the net on the country's elite and covers alcoholic drinks, fish and seafood.

Russia cuts off gas exports to Finland in symbolic move

Russia halted gas exports to neighbouring Finland on Saturday, a highly symbolic move that came just days after the Nordic country announced it wanted to join NATO and marked a likely end to Finland's nearly 50 years of importing natural gas from Russia.

U.S. accuses Russia of weaponizing food in Ukraine war

U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken accused Russia on Thursday of weaponizing food and holding grain for millions of people around the world hostage to help accomplish what its invasion of Ukraine has not -- 'to break the spirit of the Ukrainian people.'

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Why is Turkey wary of Nordic states' NATO bid?

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan has thrown a spanner in the works of Sweden and Finland's historic decisions to seek NATO membership, declaring that he cannot allow them to join due to their alleged support of Kurdish militants and other groups that Ankara says threaten its national security.

Turkey's President Recep Tayyip Erdogan at a NATO summit in Brussels, on June 14, 2021. (Yves Herman, Pool via AP)

Who are Mariupol's last defenders?

Here's a look at the Ukrainian forces and what they have accomplished during their determined last stand in a Mariupol steel mill against Russian troops.

How shortwave radio is resurfacing as a tool in Ukraine

In a world of mobile phones, satellites and the internet, some old school technology is making a major comeback. The shortwave radio, used by spies for decades to send encrypted messages, is being resurrected for the war in Ukraine.

EDITORS' PICKS

Do COVID-19 rapid tests work on Omicron?

A recent study revealed that COVID-19 rapid antigen tests may be less sensitive to newer variants, leaving some to wonder just how accurate these tests actually are. Experts share how to get the most accurate results when testing for the virus.

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