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Nick Taylor's putter drop immortalized in new RBC Canadian Open logo

Nick Taylor's iconic putter toss is being immortalized in the new logo for the RBC Canadian Open, shown in a handout. The Canadian won the 2023 event after sinking a 72-foot eagle putt on the fourth playoff hole. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO-Golf Canada Nick Taylor's iconic putter toss is being immortalized in the new logo for the RBC Canadian Open, shown in a handout. The Canadian won the 2023 event after sinking a 72-foot eagle putt on the fourth playoff hole. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO-Golf Canada
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Nick Taylor's epic putt to win the RBC Canadian Open this summer was already iconic.

Now it's been incorporated into an icon.

Golf Canada, title sponsor RBC, and tournament organizers announced Friday a tweak to the event's logo for 2024, featuring Taylor's silhouette.

The previous logo had an old-school golfer wearing a newsboy cap replacing the "I" in "Canadian." Taylor's putter-drop image is now in its place.

Golf Canada's chief marketing officer Tim McLaughlin said in a release the organization was excited to pay tribute to Taylor's win. Taylor, of Abbotsford, B.C., defeated England's Tommy Fleetwood on the fourth playoff hole at Oakdale Golf and Country Club with a 72-foot eagle.

He was the first Canadian in 69 years to win the men's national open championship.

"Nick's historic victory will be celebrated in the lead up to and throughout the 2024 RBC Canadian Open and the reimagined logo is a fitting homage to both Nick and this most special moment for our national open," McLaughlin said.

The updated brand mark will be featured prominently across the tournament's marketing efforts leading up to the 2024 event. The 2024 RBC Canadian Open takes place May 28 to June 2 at the Hamilton Golf and Country Club in Hamilton, Ont.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Dec. 1, 2023.

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