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Canada and other G7 nations 'strongly condemn' Iran's attack on Israel

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Canada and other G7 countries say they strongly condemn Iran’s overnight attack on Israel and warn the unprecedented assault risks escalating tensions in a region already embroiled in the six-month-long war between Israel and Hamas.

The Group of Seven advanced democracies issued a joint statement today expressing solidarity with Israel and reaffirming their commitment to its security.

The bloc of countries says Iran and its proxies must cease attacks and add they are prepared to take further steps in response to destabilizing efforts.

Iran launched around 300 missiles and drones at targets inside Israel onSaturday, but Israeli officials say the country and its allies were able to intercept about 99 per cent of them. 

Iran has since declared the operation over.

Conflict between Israel and Iran heightened after an airstrike blamed on Israel destroyed Iran's consulate in Syria and killed seven senior Iranian officials earlier this month, prompting Tehran to vow revenge.

Air Canada says it has cancelled three round-trip flights between Toronto and Tel Aviv from this weekend through Wednesday.

Its non-stop flight to Israel's largest city, which the airline had resumed just last week after a six-month hiatus, remains on the schedule for Thursday but could be subject to change.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published April 14, 2024

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