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In inaugural address, Biden will appeal to national unity

U.S. President-elect Joe Biden will deliver an appeal to national unity when he is sworn in Wednesday and plans immediate moves to combat the coronavirus pandemic and undo some of President Donald Trump's most controversial policies, his incoming chief of staff said Sunday.

U.S. President-elect Joe Biden departs the St. Joseph on the Brandywine Catholic Church, Saturday, Jan. 16, 2021, in Wilmington, Del. (AP Photo/Matt Slocum)

Records: Trump allies behind rally that ignited Capitol riot

Members of U.S. President Donald Trump's failed presidential campaign played key roles in orchestrating the Washington rally that spawned a deadly assault on the U.S. Capitol, according to an Associated Press review of records, undercutting claims the event was the brainchild of the president's grassroots supporters.

In this Wednesday, Jan. 6, 2021 file photo, supporters of U.S. President Donald Trump are confronted by U.S. Capitol Police officers outside the Senate Chamber inside the Capitol in Washington. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

Biden to prioritize legal status for millions of immigrants

U.S. President-elect Joe Biden's decision to immediately ask Congress to offer legal status to an estimated 11 million people in the country has surprised advocates given how the issue has long divided Democrats and Republicans, even within their own parties.

Coronavirus Coverage

Shoppers walk wearing face masks and carrying shopping bags in Regent Street, after coronavirus restrictions were eased following the end of the second national lockdown in England, in London, Saturday, Dec. 5, 2020. (AP Photo/Alberto Pezzali)
Mother putting a face mask on her daughter. (August de Richelieu/ Pexels)

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Climate and Environment

Nations failing to fund climate adaptation: UN

The world is falling short of promises made under the Paris climate deal to help the most vulnerable nations deal with the increasingly devastating impacts of climate change, according to the United Nations.

Forests may flip from CO2 'sink' to 'source' by 2050

Forests and other land ecosystems today absorb 30 per cent of humanity's CO2 pollution, but rapid global warming could transform these natural 'sinks' into carbon 'sources' within a few decades, opening another daunting front in the fight against climate change.

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