Skip to main content

Pencils down: SAT makes all-digital change for college entrance exam

The College Board is ditching the paper and pencil version of the SAT exam for an all-digital version that they say will be more efficient for those taking the standardized college entrance exam. (WCVB) The College Board is ditching the paper and pencil version of the SAT exam for an all-digital version that they say will be more efficient for those taking the standardized college entrance exam. (WCVB)
Share
NEEDHAM, Massachusetts -

The College Board is ditching the paper and pencil version of the SAT exam for an all-digital version that they say will be more efficient for those taking the standardized college entrance exam.

A transition to the all-digital test began in March 2023 with international testing centers. In fall 2023, all PSAT-related exams transitioned to the digital model.

Now, the full suite of SAT assessments is moving from paper to screens. Students will bring their own laptop or tablet or can borrow one for the test.

"What's really neat about transitioning to the digital SAT suite is that we were incredibly intentional about ensuring that the test would be easier to take, easier to give, more secure, and more relevant," said Nicole Gibbs, of the College Board.

Gibbs said the change also improves the security of the test and limits cheating.

"What that means is if we're sitting in the same classroom, I will have a test that is very different in terms of the questions than the person sitting beside me," she said. "In that sense, because there is a unique test form, it really minimizes the opportunity for students to share answers."

The digital SAT was first piloted in 2021 and the College Board said 80 per cent of students have reported it was less stressful.

One hundred percent of educators also reported a positive experience with the format, according to the organization.

CTVNews.ca Top Stories

Local Spotlight

'It was surreal': Ontario mother gives birth to son on day of solar eclipse

For many, Monday's total solar eclipse will become a distant memory or collection of photos to scroll through in the years to come. But for Alannah Duarte and her family, they'll be reminded of the rare celestial event every year they celebrate their youngest son's birthday, as he was born on the day of the momentous occasion.