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Thousands of pickup trucks, SUVs recalled in Canada over increased risk of crash

This Tuesday, June 13, 2017, photo, shows the Toyota logo at Mark Miller Toyota in Salt Lake City. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer) This Tuesday, June 13, 2017, photo, shows the Toyota logo at Mark Miller Toyota in Salt Lake City. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer)
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Toyota is conducting a safety recall to approximately 28,061 SUVs and pickup trucks in Canada involving transmission issues, the company said in a press release on Thursday.

The cars affected include the Toyota Tundra, Sequoia and Lexus LX 600 from the 2023 and 2024 model years.

Toyota said that certain parts of the cars' transmission may not immediately disengage when the vehicle is shifted to neutral.

"This can allow some engine power to continue to be transferred to the wheels and can allow the vehicle to inadvertently creep forward at a low speed when it is on a flat surface and no brakes are applied, leading to an increased risk of a crash," the statement said.

Toyota and Lexus dealers will update the transmission software to fix the issue. Owners of the recalled vehicles will be notified by late April, Toyota said.

In January, Toyota recalled certain 2003 to 2004 models in Canada, including nearly 5,000 Corollas, 1,600 Corolla Matrixes and 700 RAV4s due to faulty air bag inflators.

Am I affected by the recall?

Customers who believe they’re affected by the recall can check Toyota Canada or Lexus Canada's websites and enter their vehicle identification number.

If your vehicle is impacted, contact a Toyota or Lexus dealership to update that car's software, free of charge.

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