Skip to main content

Survivors of 2017 Ariana Grande concert bombing take legal action against intelligence agency

FILE - A man stands next to flowers for the victims of a bombing at St. Ann's Square in central Manchester, England, May 26, 2017. More than 250 survivors of the suicide bombing are taking legal action against Britain's domestic intelligence agency, lawyers said April 14, 2024. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti, File) FILE - A man stands next to flowers for the victims of a bombing at St. Ann's Square in central Manchester, England, May 26, 2017. More than 250 survivors of the suicide bombing are taking legal action against Britain's domestic intelligence agency, lawyers said April 14, 2024. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti, File)
Share
LONDON -

More than 250 survivors of the suicide bombing that killed 22 people at a 2017 Ariana Grande concert in Manchester, England are taking legal action against Britain's domestic intelligence agency, lawyers said.

Lawyers from three law firms said Sunday they have submitted a group claim on behalf of more than 250 clients to the U.K.'s investigatory powers tribunal. They said they could not provide further details because it was an ongoing legal matter.

Suicide bomber Salman Abedi set up a knapsack bomb in Manchester Arena, in northwestern England, at the end of Grande's concert on May 22, 2017, as thousands of young fans were leaving. More than 100 people were injured, many of them children and teenagers. Abedi died in the explosion.

An official inquiry reported last year that Britain's domestic intelligence agency, MI5, didn't act swiftly enough on key information and missed a significant opportunity to prevent the bombing, the deadliest extremist attack in the U.K. in recent years.

Abedi had been a "subject of interest" to MI5 officials in 2014, but his case was closed shortly after because he was deemed to be low-risk.

The report also found that one MI5 officer admitted they considered intelligence about Abedi to be a possible national security concern, but didn't discuss it with colleagues quickly enough.

Ken McCallum, the head of MI5, said in a rare televised statement that he was "profoundly sorry" his agency was unable to prevent the attack.

CTVNews.ca Top Stories

Group tied to Islamic State plotted fatal Ontario restaurant shooting: Crown

A gunman who is accused of killing a young Ontario man and shooting four of his family members at their small Mississauga restaurant in 2021 was allegedly part of a trio who had pledged allegiance to the listed terrorist group Islamic State, a Crown attorney said in an opening statement in the Brampton murder trial this week.

Local Spotlight