Skip to main content

As it happened: Zelenskyy visits Canada, addresses Parliament as PM pledges $650M in Ukraine aid

Addressing a joint session of Parliament, Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy offered repeated thanks to Canada for its continued support for his country as it continues to defend itself from Russia's invasion.

His speech was the marquee event of his visit to Canada, and he used the opportunity to make his case for why persisting allegiance is needed. Speaking to a rapt crowd, he said Canada's assistance so far has saved thousands of lives, and is helping strip Vladimir Putin from the ability to use energy as a weapon of war.

"This Russian aggression must end with our victory," Zelenskyy told the House of Commons, after painting a grim picture of the kinds of horrors seen on the streets in the last 19 months.

During the visit, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau announced Canada will be making a $650 million "multi-year commitment that provides predictable, steady support to Ukraine," which will include sending more armoured vehicles, as well as other mental health and charity funding boosts. Canada has also levelled new sanctions against Russia.

"In this era of uncertainty and of resurgent great power competition, rules are what will protect us… History will judge us on how we defend democratic values and Ukraine is at the tip of the spear in this great challenge of the 21st century," Trudeau said, introducing the Ukrainian leader.

"This is a challenge on a generational scale, a challenge that history will judge us on, a challenge we must confront with lionhearted courage."

This visit—his first since Russian President Vladimir Putin's February 2022 invasion of Ukraine—is being held under tight security, and follows stops at the White House in Washington, D.C., and United Nations General Assembly in New York City.

Accompanied by the First Lady of Ukraine Olena Zelenska, prior to, and following his address, the couple made a series of stops alongside Trudeau and members of cabinet, in Ottawa.

CTVNews.ca provided minute-by-minute updates on Zelenskyy's visit. Recap the entire day, below.

4:40 p.m.: Soon, Trudeau, Freeland and the Zelenskyy delegation will travel to Toronto, for evening events, first a meeting holding a roundtable with Canadian business leaders and then an event with members of the Ukrainian-Canadian community. Visit CTV News Toronto for more from those events. This marks the last live update of the day from CTV News' Parliamentary Bureau, thank you for following along. 

4:25 p.m.: Some colour about one of the behind-the-scenes visits: While in the nation's capital, the First Lady of Ukraine met with researchers serving veterans and their families during a visit to the Royal Ottawa Hospital, according to Trudeau's office. She was joined by Minister of Veterans Affairs Ginette Petitpas-Taylor, and Minister of Mental Health and Addictions Ya'ara Saks.

4:20 p.m.: This marks the end of the official Ottawa program of Zelenskyy's visit. To put what unfolded in perspective, today's announcements bring Canada's total committed support to more than $9.5 billion in assistance to Ukraine since the beginning of 2022. "As long as it takes," is the Liberal government's position.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy hold a joint media availability in Ottawa on Friday, Sept. 22, 2023. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

3:53 p.m.: Questioning continues one from Ukraine media around Russian sanction evasions, and one from Canadian media in French, again on the potential war fatigue setting in, that it's getting hard to convince countries to continue to offer more aid. Both respond, Trudeau says he knows it is an economically-difficult time for Canadians, and crises have multiplied since the COVID-19 pandemic, but this support to Ukraine is about helping people get through these hard times, too because of what the consequences would be if Russia was victorious. Zelenskyy, seeming a bit tired, says Trudeau has covered it well. A few minutes later, the press conference ends. 

3:47 p.m.: Zelenskyy speaks about how journalists "are the weapons capable of uniting the society," says he discussed this with Trudeau. "We can not let Russia divide the opinions in the world," he said. Trudeau notes how "interconnected" Canada is and how that provides platforms to raise the continued need to back Ukraine and uphold the rule of law. 

3:45 p.m.: First question is on security guarantees and peace formula. Trudeau in response points to today's announcement, says Canada will pick a few points of peace plan to lead on. Zelenskyy says big task is for Ukraine to get as many countries on-side. Second question is from CTV News' Kevin Gallagher: Did President Biden promised to send Ukraine long-range army tactical missile systems? And for both leaders, how concerned are you about divisions in U.S. Congress and NATO allies like Poland pulling military support for Ukraine... And what can Canada do in that respect with allies? Zelenskyy says they are discussing different types of weapons with the U.S. says Russia is spreading disinformation narratives regarding softening support for Ukraine. 

3:40 p.m.: Q&A kicks off, the pair of world leaders will only take two questions from the Canadian media and two questions from the travelling Ukrainian media.

3:35 p.m.: Zelenskyy speaks in Ukrainian, based on the translator, he said he wanted to come to Canada to personally thank Canadians. He calls Ukraine's desired victory in this war, a "common victory," and emphasized how much he appreciates the latest round of aid being offered as it is highly needed. 

3:32 p.m.: Other bits of funding: $4.3 million to strengthen nuclear security measures at the Chornobyl Exclusion Zone; $1.7 million for Canadian NGO eQualitie to enhance the cyber resilience of Ukrainian civil society; $2 million for Canadian NGO Parliamentary Centre for technical assistance for the Ukrainian Parliament; $250,000 for Ukrainian NGO Building Ukraine Together for community-level youth engagement and recovery initiative, and $34 million in development assistance for four multi-year initiatives supporting: mental health, small-scale farmers and restoration of agricultural livelihoods, local infrastructure rehabilitation and reconstruction, technical assistance for inclusive recovery.

3:30 p.m.: Trudeau begins by re-announcing what he said in the House earlier, but now with more details. The prime minister announced Canada is "shifting our approach to provide multi-year assistance and ensure Ukraine has the predictable support it needs for long-term success." This "macro economic support" includes: $650M over three years to supply Ukraine with 50 armoured vehicles; detailing allocations of a previously-committed $500 million which will include drone cameras, NATO-standard small arms, and a United Kingdom-led partnership delivering high priority air defence equipment. Trudeau said 63 Russian individuals and entities "complicit in the illegal transfer and custody of Ukrainian children, generating and disseminating disinformation and propaganda, as well as entities in Russia's nuclear sector are being added to the sanctions list."

Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy, left, and Prime Minister Justin Trudeau shake hands ahead of a joint press conference on Parliament Hill in Ottawa on Friday, Sept. 22, 2023. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

3:20 p.m.: They sign, shake hands. What they signed was the modernized Canada-Ukraine Free Trade Agreement (CUFTA), "which supports long-term security, stability, and economic development in Ukraine, while also ensuring high-quality market access terms for Canadian businesses participating in Ukraine’s economic recovery." 

3:15 pm.: Ok we have movement. Trudeau and Zelenskyy have just crossed the street, on foot, from Parliament Hill to the Sir John A. Macdonald Building where their signing ceremony "to continue strengthening economic ties between our two countries," and joint media availability will take place. 

3:00 p.m.: Trudeau and Zelenskyy's joint address and media availability is running behind schedule. From the feed inside the room where it's set to take place, the red carpet has been rolled out and Canadian parliamentarians are standing within the camera shot, likely they will either witness, or act as a backdrop for some of what's about to unfold. 

2:35 p.m.: Conservative Leader Pierre Poilievre issued a statement, saying he was "pleased to welcome President Zelenskyy to Canada's Parliament and hear his speech." "Conservatives share the Ukrainian values of faith, family, and freedom. We will stand for those values at home and abroad. Ukrainians know better than anyone the importance of freedom as they have had to defeat communism, fascism, and other forms of socialism," the statement continues. Without mentioning Trudeau's latest funding commitment directly, Poilievre says "Canada should continue to help Ukrainians win their freedom." 

2:22 p.m.: The official program ends in the House of Commons, following closing remarks from Senate Speaker Raymonde Gagne. 

Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy delivers a speech in the House of Commons in Ottawa on Friday, Sept. 22, 2023. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

2:07 p.m.: After joking -- he was a comedian pre-politics -- earlier in the day about not speaking French, Zelenskyy offers a "merci, Canada." He speaks about a word Gov. Gen. Mary Simon taught him earlier in the day, which means "don't give up," and "stay strong against all odds." Then, running roughly 20-minutes in total, he ends his address with "Slava Ukraini" which translates to "Glory to Ukraine." A standing ovation follows, and he walks along the front government benches, shaking hands. 

1:59 p.m.: Zelenskyy says Canada's support has allowed for thousands of lives to be saved, and the global push to get off of Russian oil will result in energy no longer being a weapon of war, just an energy resource. This gets big applause. He goes on to say that in his meeting with Trudeau and cabinet ministers, they discussed the Canadian initiative regarding confiscating Russian assets, because "those funds that Russia and its henchmen used to pay for their war should be used to fairly compensate for the damage caused." 

Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy receives a standing ovation from Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and parliamentarians as he arrives to deliver a speech in the House of Commons in Ottawa on Friday, Sept. 22, 2023. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

1:52 p.m.: "This Russian aggression must end with our victory," Zelenskyy says, after painting a grim picture of the kinds of horrors seen on the streets in Ukraine since Putin's invasion. I have already lost track of the number of times he has said "thank you." 

1:48 p.m.: Zelenskyy begins his address with "thank you so much." 

1:42 p.m.: The prime minister announces Canada was making "a longer-term, multi-year commitment that provides predictable, steady support to Ukraine. It will include $650 million over three years for 50 armored vehicles, including medical evacuation vehicles, which will be built by Canadian workers in London, Ont." He also announced the government will send F-16 trainers for pilots and for maintenance, "so Ukrainians are able to maximize their use of donated fighter jets." 

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau speaks before Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy delivers his speech in the House of Commons in Ottawa on Friday, Sept. 22, 2023. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

1:38 p.m.: Trudeau, still in his opening remarks, says "in this era of uncertainty and of resurgent great power competition, rules are what will protect us. And it's not enough for them to just be written down somewhere. We must advocate for them, stand up for them, and live by them. History will judge us on how we defend democratic values and Ukraine is at the tip of the spear in this great challenge of the 21st century." As he speaks, Freeland, who is sitting directly behind Zelenskyy, nods. he then recognizes some of the thousands of Ukrainians that have fled to Canada, who are present. 

1:30 p.m.: Prime Minister Justin Trudeau addresses the audience. "This is a time of incredible uncertainty. Attacks upon the rules-based international order threaten to upend the peace and prosperity that have been the bedrock of Canada's success. This is a challenge on a generational scale, a challenge that history will judge us on, a challenge we must confront with lionhearted courage," Trudeau says.

"One year, six months and 29 days ago, Vladimir Putin launched a full scale invasion of Ukraine, unleashing a campaign of violence and brutality that has left countless dead and forced millions to flee. But for one year, six months and 29 days, the people of Ukraine have defended their homes, their language, and their freedom to choose their own future. They have fought back with a courage that has inspired the world and they have been led by President Zelenskyy, a great champion of democracy." 

1:28 p.m.: Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy and First Lady of Ukraine Olena Zelenska enter the floor of the House of Commons, to the first of likely many standing ovations. Speaker Rota begins his opening remarks, he calls it an "extraordinary event." 

1:24 p.m.: Deputy House Speaker Chris d'Entremont comes out to update the rapt audience, he gives a five-minute head's up that the main event is about to get underway.  

1:21 p.m.: Chatter in the chamber picks up again as the afternoon address is running a bit behind schedule. 

Foreign Affairs Minister Melanie Joly talks to Conservative MP Michael Chong before a speech by Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy in the House of Commons in Ottawa on Friday, Sept. 22, 2023. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

1:11 p.m.: MPs have taken their seats and chatter fills the chamber as they await Zelenskyy, some politicians have brought their children in to the House for the occasion, some are wearing Ukrainian colours and lapel pins of the Ukrainian flag. Moments later, a silence falls over the Commons as all rise to their feet in applause. 

12:55 p.m.: The House of Commons Chamber is rapidly filling with members of Parliament, Senators, and other dignitaries who will soon be hearing an address from Zelenskyy. Zelenskyy's speech to parliamentarians will be proceeded by introductions from House Speaker Anthony Rota and Trudeau. Afterwards, there will not be remarks from opposition party leaders as is the case with some special addresses.

12:31 p.m.: As part of CTV News Chief Political Correspondent Vassy Kapelos' special live coverage, Liberal MP and chair of the Canada-Ukraine Parliamentary Friendship Group Yvan Baker, called Friday's visit "incredibly significant." "Canadians can be very proud of the contributions that we've made." Baker said he expects Zelenskyy to use his platform in the House of Commons to try to convince those Canadians who may be weary about how much support Canada is offering abroad, at a time of cost-of-living pressures at home.

"I think it's really important that we remember that this war isn't just about Ukraine, it's not just the right thing to do to support Ukraine, although it is, but this is something that touches all of us." Baker said. 

12:15 p.m.: According to a pool report provided to Parliament Hill media by the designated reporter granted access to the room, during what's been described as an "extended bilat" Trudeau was greeted by Ukraine's Ambassador to Canada Yuliya Kovaliv, and as he took his seat, Zelenskyy joked that there was too much paper in front of him, getting a laugh from the room. The PM was one side of the table with the Canadian delegation, and directly across from him was Zelenskyy and his.

In addition to Canadian ministers, Deputy Minister of Natural Resources John Hannaford, National Security and Intelligence Adviser Jody Thomas, Senior Global Affairs Adviser Patrick Traverse, and Trudeau's Chief of Staff Katie Telford were present, among others.

Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy (centre left ) and Prime Minister Justin Trudeau (centre right) take part in an expanded bilateral meeting in Ottawa on Friday, Sept. 22, 2023. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

11:55 a.m.: CTV News' Annie Bergeron-Oliver has confirmed that on Friday the federal government will announce $650 million in additional military assistance, over the next few years.

As part of that money, Canada will supply more Leopard 2 tanks. Canada will also be applying new sanctions against Russia. Context: Since January 2022, Canada has provided more than $9.8 billion in military, economic, and humanitarian aid. The federal government has also levelled multiple rounds of Russian sanctions, deployed Canadian Armed Forces to Europe to train Ukrainian soldiers, and welcomed more than 175,000 Ukrainians to this country.

11:45 a.m.: Zelenskyy took part in an expanded bilateral meeting with Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Finance Chrystia Freeland, Minister of National Defence Bill Blair, Minister of Foreign Affairs Melanie Joly, and Minister of Export Promotion, International Trade and Economic Development Mary Ng.

11:05: a.m.: Zelenskyy says this during his bilateral opening remarks, before media were ushered out of the room: "Thanks so much Justin. Thank you very much for hosting us, me, my wife and my team, and thank you for this invitation. It's a privilege for us to be in Canada... I'm thankful to you, your government and of course to all the Canadians. I have a lot of warm words and thanks to say from Ukrainians to you, your beautiful country. I know it's beautiful, I have no time to see it but I know that it's beautiful. I think after the victory… of course we will come, maybe with children… In this tough period you hosted Ukrainians and you helped us on the battlefield, militarily, and financially, and humanitarian aid, which is crucial. I can say it in English, in Ukrainian, and I am sorry but I have no French… Thank you so much."

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau meets with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy on Parliament Hill in Ottawa on Friday, Sept. 22, 2023. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

11:04 a.m.: Trudeau and Zelenskyy sit in the PM's office for a bilateral meeting. Trudeau says: "It is an extraordinary privilege and pleasure to be able to welcome my friend Volodymyr to Ottawa. This is yet another opportunity for us to sit down and talk about all the things we need to continue to do together to make sure the rule of law is supported, make sure we're supporting everything that Ukraine is doing. And also make sure we're standing very, very strongly against Russia… But this is also an opportunity for Canadians to express directly to Volodymyr and through him to the Ukrainian people how strongly and unequivocally we stand with Ukraine. It is it is a very exciting day for Canada to be able to welcome you here."

11:01 a.m.: Zelenskyy was invited to sign the distinguished visitors books of the House and Senate, before heading down the hall for a bilateral meeting with Trudeau.

10:57 a.m.: According to a pool report provided to Parliament Hill media, ahead of the DND event with Blair and Umerov, Chief of Defence Staff Gen. Wayne Eyre gave the CAF members a short pep talk, telling them that "first impressions" are important.

"Everybody's got a role in this," Eyre said, referring to the Russian invasion of Ukraine. Umerov then entered the room, stood on a small platform, flanked by the Ukrainian and Canadian flags. The Ukrainian and Canadian national anthems played. Upon exiting the building, Conservative MP James Bezan was standing in the foyer, to hold his own meeting with Ukraine's minister.

Canadian Chief of Defence staff General Wayne Eyre (left) guides Ukrainian Minister of Defence Rustem Umerov (right) as Canadian Minister of Defence Bill Blair follows after a honour guard ceremony at Canadian Defence headquarters in Ottawa on Friday Sept. 22, 2023. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Fred Chartrand

10:53 a.m.: Ukraine's president has arrived on Parliament Hill. He is greeted by Trudeau, a big hug. His welcoming party includes Conservative Leader Pierre Poilievre, Bloc Quebecois Leader Yves-Francois Blanchet, NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh, and other parliamentary officials, including Senators and the speakers of both chambers.

According to the pool report from inside the room, Poilievre said to Zelenskyy that he's proud to come from Western Canada, where many proud Ukrainian's have built Canada. Poilievre then introduced Saskatchewan Sen. Denise Batters, who was wearing a blouse her Ukrainian grandmother had embroidered more than 100 years ago, before coming to Canada.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau welcomes Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy as he arrives on Parliament Hill in Ottawa on Friday, Sept. 22, 2023. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

10:32 a.m.: Members of the Canadian Armed Forces are standing ready for inspection, as National Defence Minister Bill Blair hosts Ukraine's Minister of Defence Rustem Umerov, at National Defence Headquarters.

10:12 a.m.: CTV News reports the Communications Security Establishment (CSE) and Canadian Centre for Cyber Security re-issued their call to "adopt a heightened state of vigilance, and to bolster their awareness of and protection against malicious cyber threats." The CSE emphasized the call especially for operators of government and critical infrastructure websites. 

10:04 a.m.: Volodymyr Zelenskyy and Olena Zelenska enter Rideau Hall, he is dressed in army green, she is in a tan pantsuit. The couple sit down with Canada's governor general, exchanged pleasantries and spoke briefly. 

Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy, left, meets with Governor General Mary Simon in Ottawa on Friday, Sept. 22, 2023. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

9:50 a.m.: Zelenskyy's motorcade of what appears to be more than 20 vehicles pulled up the drive at Rideau Hall for Zelenskyy and First Lady's meeting with Gov. Gen. Mary Simon and her husband Whit Fraser.

9:22 a.m.: Prime Minister Justin Trudeau arrives on Parliament Hill ahead of Zelenskyy's arrival. He didn't respond when CTV News asked if he is going to be pledging more military support for Ukraine during today's visit. In a scrum moments prior, NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh said he would "absolutely" support Canada offering more aid. "There's more that we need to do." Singh said he thinks Ukraine is "fighting not just for their own rights... they're defending the rights of international law and justice for all for all citizens of the world. They're really fighting a battle... for justice for everyone."

IN DEPTH

ANALYSIS

ANALYSIS What do the policies Poilievre's party passed say about the Conservatives' future?

Conservative Leader Pierre Poilievre spent the summer speaking about housing affordability, a core focus that attendees at the party's Quebec City convention were quick to praise him for. But by the end of the weekend, delegates opted to instead pass policies on contentious social issues. What does that say about the Conservatives' future?

Opinion

opinion

opinion Don Martin: With Trudeau resignation fever rising, a Conservative nightmare appears

With speculation rising that Prime Minister Justin Trudeau will follow his father's footsteps in the snow to a pre-election resignation, political columnist Don Martin focuses on one Liberal cabinet minister who's emerging as leadership material -- and who stands out as a fresh-faced contrast to the often 'angry and abrasive' leader of the Conservatives.

OPINION

OPINION Don Martin: Life in Trudeau's brain defies imagination

Getting inside Justin Trudeau's head these days requires a vivid imagination. The prime minister's bizarre statement on the Middle East war this week reflects a distorted view that human-shielded resistance by Hamas terrorists can be overcome with "maximum restraint" by Israel's military.

CTVNews.ca Top Stories

These are the 5 headlines you should read this morning

A gunman kills three people on a Las Vegas school campus, Pierre Poilievre threatens to delay MPs' holidays and a Saskatchewan veteran receives France's highest order of distinction. Here's what you need to know to start your day.

Stay Connected