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Former Assembly of First Nations national chief suing organization for $5 million

Assembly of First Nations National Chief, RoseAnne Archibald, speaks during her closing address at the Assembly of First Nations Special Chiefs Assembly in Ottawa, Thursday, Dec. 8, 2022. (Spencer Colby/THE CANADIAN PRESS) Assembly of First Nations National Chief, RoseAnne Archibald, speaks during her closing address at the Assembly of First Nations Special Chiefs Assembly in Ottawa, Thursday, Dec. 8, 2022. (Spencer Colby/THE CANADIAN PRESS)
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OTTAWA -

The former national chief of the Assembly of First Nations is suing the organization and its executive for defamation and breach of contract, asking for $5 million in damages.

RoseAnne Archibald, who was ousted from the job last July, alleges that a "number of illegal and unlawful steps" were made against her, including suspending her as national chief.

After she was elected, she had called for the AFN to hire a forensic accounting firm to review their books.

The suit alleges that the executive then "embarked on a campaign to sideline her and ultimately oust her as national chief."

In a statement, the Assembly of First Nations says it won't comment until the matter is resolved through a legal process.

Crown-Indigenous Relations Minister Gary Anandasangaree says the AFN is a "valued partner" for the federal government, and he won't weigh in on internal matters.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published June 20, 2024.

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