Peer pressure from more than one friend influenced a Toronto woman accused of throwing chairs and other objects off a Toronto highrise balcony, her lawyer said Wednesday.

“She is embarrassed by what happened,” said Gregory Leslie to reporters. “Of course, she would never wish anybody would be hurt.”

Marcella Zoia, a 19-year-old Toronto resident and dental hygiene student, was released on $2,000 bail Wednesday, smiling but mostly silent as a throng of reporters asked how she was feeling. “I’m OK,” she said. When asked directly if Zoia wanted to apologize for the alleged incident, she turned away from reporters and left the courthouse. “Whoa, this is crazy,” she said moving through a crowd of journalists.

Her lawyer told reporters that police are looking for the four others who were at the condo at the time of the incident. “She is a young lady who made a mistake. It was a momentary lapse of judgment,” said Leslie.

Zoia appeared in court Wednesday to face charges of common nuisance, mischief endangering life and damage to property over $5,000. As part of the conditions of her release, Zoia has been ordered to live with her mother and have no contact with any of the four other parties named in the incident. She is also prohibited from possessing a weapon and is not allowed to return to the condo building.

The president of a nearby condo association said the accused shouldn’t be allowed on any balcony, not just the Maple Leaf Square Condos. “It sends a message that you can’t just go from a balcony and decide to just pick up a chair and throw because you felt you had peer pressure from your friends,” said Gary Pieters, president of CityPlace Residents Association. “Your peer pressure could have led to the death of somebody else.”

Earlier this week, short video circulated showing a blonde woman tossing a chair off a downtown condo balcony, believed to be some 40 storeys up. The nine-second clip has been seen more than 978,000 times since being posted to Facebook Saturday. Toronto police issued a public plea on Monday to identify the woman in the video, who they say turned herself in around 7 a.m. on Wednesday morning.

Leslie acknowledged the Crown has a “strong case” considering the video evidence, but added he hopes to avoid a trial in the matter.

“We will just take this through the proper course, through the right channels…and we’ll go from there,” he said. “We’re going to have discussions with the Crown’s office. This might not go to trial. We’ll see how this works, but that’s a long way down the road.”

Zoia is due back in court March 22.

With files from CP24 and CTV Toronto