As International Women’s Day tributes pour in celebrating the achievements of pioneering women, others are celebrating the hopes of future generations. From making a breakthrough in cancer research to becoming the greatest black female science-fiction author, women and girls are sharing their dreams and aspirations in a new social media campaign.

Google issued a special doodle on Tuesday that looks to the future, celebrating the dreams and aspirations of women from around the world.

Members of the Google Doodle team headed to 13 different countries and asked 337 women and girls to complete the sentence, "One day I will..." The team recorded their responses and compiled them into an online video, with a few additional doodles, of course.

Ranging in age and ethnicity, the women and girls share their goals in the video, which range in scope and nature.

From playing baseball in the major leagues to opening a science laboratory to dazzling an audience with Michael Jackson-like dance moves to marrying their same-sex partner, the video shows the breadth and diversity of the aspirations of women and girls.

Google Doodle

Women's Day

Google Doodle

British anthropologist Jane Goodall and education activist Malala Yousafzai also appear in the video.

"I will discuss the environment with Pope Francis," Goodall says, while standing in a lush leafy garden.

Women's Day

Yousafzai, who was shot by the Taliban in 2012 for her work advocating for girls' education, stands arm-in-arm with Syrian activist Muzoon Almellehan. "One day we will see every girl in school," they say together.

Women's Day

In a blog post, the Google Doodle team said it was exciting to speak with women and girls from all over the world.

"It's not always easy to put into words what you want to achieve," the blog post said. "Whether their responses were detailed or broad strokes, concrete or abstract, funny or heartwarming, it was inspiring to see them take the time to dream."

Google asked other women to share their dreams and aspirations on social media under the hashtag #OneDayIWill. Here are a few of the responses:

Celebrating Canadian trailblazers

To mark International Women's Day, Esri Canada released an interactive map showcasing the achievements of Canadian heroines.

The map showcases different women who left their mark on the country over time, including aboriginal poet Pauline Johnson, war correspondent Kathleen “Kit” Coleman, painter Emily Carr, and Agnes Macphail, the first woman elected to the House of Commons.


Credit Esri Canada

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau issued a statement on Tuesday, recognizing the significance of the day.

"On this special day, we celebrate the many achievements of women in Canada – and around the world – and we reaffirm our commitment to gender equality," he said.

"While we have made enormous progress towards equality over the years, we know that we still have a lot of hard work to do. Far too many women and girls continue to face injustices and discrimination."

Trudeau, who has described himself as a feminist, made headlines after he appointed a gender-balanced cabinet last fall. After the swearing-in ceremony, he was asked why he felt gender-parity was important. "Because it's 2015," he answered.

In the statement, Trudeau said all Canadians must continue to work on upholding women's rights.

"It is unacceptable that in 2016, women are still denied an education, forced into an early marriage, or made victims of gender-based violence," he said.

"We remain committed to advancing gender equality, so that Canada can become a country where all women and girls can reach their full potential."