Super Bowl advertising has become something of a cultural phenomenon, with many Americans just as eager to tune in Sunday to watch the game as the entertaining ads that accompany it.

But by Feb. 2, many of the commercials -- released ahead of time on YouTube -- will have already been viewed.

This year, 30-second spots will cost approximately US$4 million -- a price many marketers are willing to pay, considering about 100 million Americans will be tuning in to watch the sporting event.

Anthony Kalamut, a Seneca College creative advertising professor, said the cost for a spot is “money well spent for any of the brands that are there.”

“It’s about brand loyalty building,” Kalamut told CTV News. “It’s a way of saying thank you, it’s a way of telling a story.” 

CTVNews.ca has complied some of the pre-released ads for the Super Bowl. This year’s ads may not feature sexy car washes or a close-up of Bar Rafaeli kissing a very lucky computer geek that had tongues wagging in 2013, but there are plenty of laughs to be had and maybe tears, too (see “Puppy Love” below).

SodaStream

First off, a commercial meant for the Super Bowl that U.S. viewers won’t be seeing. SodaStream hired Scarlett Johansson to sell fizzy water, but the ad was banned by Fox because of Johansson’s closing line: “Sorry Coke and Pepsi.”

GoDaddy: “Bodybuilder”

NASCAR star Danica Patrick bulks up in a muscle suit and jogs alongside ridiculously buffed-up men.

Axe: “Make Love, Not war”

The body spray brand makes a call for world peace, asking men to “make love, not war.”

Jaguar: “Rendezvous”

The British automaker decided to feature Sir Ben Kingsley, Tom Hiddleston and Mark Strong as British villains in its Jaguar F-Type Coupe ad.

Cheerios: “Gracie”

Cheerios brought back an interracial family, which was featured in an ad last year, and received an outpouring of support after sparking racist comments online. 

Budweiser: “Puppy Love”

Keeping up with the theme from last year’s “Brotherhood” ad, “Puppy Love” features a puppy that befriends a horse after escaping from an adoption centre.