If New York City serves as a trends bellwether, then the legions of "foodies" who have made Internet "foodporn" so popular may soon see their digital documentation of restaurant meals come to an end.

According to a report in the New York Times, restaurateurs in some of the city's most popular establishments are clamping down on customers' tableside photography.

The practice of so-called "foodstagramming," in which restaurant-goers post pictures of their meals online, has exploded alongside the increasing ubiquity of smartphones equipped with cameras and the growing popularity of Instagram and other similar photo-sharing services.

Among Instagram's 90 million users, for instance, a quick search reveals hordes of them showcasing tempting photos of their meals. As does a search for #foodstagram on Twitter, or even "foodporn" on Google.

But it's the lengths some of the amateur photographers go to that has restaurant operators up in arms.

While some customers will discreetly document their dishes, others aren't afraid to let the flash bulbs pop, or even stand on their chair to capture the composition of their plate from a flattering angle.

The article highlights one diner's experience at chef David Chang's exclusive 12-seat restaurant Momofuku Ko, where an attempt to snap a pic of her shaved foie gras dish was met with an embarrassing dressing down.

Instead of taking a souvenir shot for prosperity, she was struck by a sharp directive to put her phone away from staff informing her that photos aren’t allowed.

There's no blanket policy yet, however. Other restaurants in chef Chang's empire for instance, including his recently-opened Toronto outpost, allow picture-taking but draw the line at flash photography.

Whatever the trend, Twitter has lit up with reaction to the report.

"NYC is showing how uber pompous they are. They want to BAN us from taking pictures of our food. Not cool..." @tvfoodies wrote.

And @Evilmoments wrote, "Screw them! I paid!"

But Twitter user @sarakategordon exemplifies a more considered approach, tweeting: "No flash at restos, yes. But foodstagramming is amazing advocacy!"

What do you think, should there be limits on photographing restaurant meals?