A fast-growing petition is asking the Canadian government to ban the import of cat and dog pelts parading as "faux" furs.

According to the text of the petition, "millions of dogs and cats" are raised and killed overseas for their meat and pelts, and some of these furs wind up in Canadian products.

Humane Society International has been outspoken about the issue in the past.

An investigation by the society found that most of cat and dog furs are harvested in Asia, and then sold and marketed as "faux" fur in other places around the world.

According to the investigation, the "primary" use of this fur is not for full-length coats, but for trimmings on parkas, gloves, boots, hats and other accessories.

"With rare exceptions, dog and cat products are not labelled as such," the investigation says.

In response to this, the Canadian petition is asking the government to "ban the importation of any dog and cat pelts or furs, and prohibit the sale of said products in Canada."

Similar bans already exist in the U.S., European Union and Australia.

Sponsored by Vancouver Kingsway NDP MP Don Davies, the online petition has garnered more than 6,000 signatures since its launch on Jan. 18, 2016.

More than 2,700 of these signatories come from British Columbia alone.

"It's something that shocks the conscience of most Canadians and shocked mine," Davies told CTV Vancouver. "It made me upset enough to want to sponsor this petition and bring it to the attention of this government."

The petition has also attracted the attention of other high-profile Canadians, including singer Bif Naked, who shared the petition with her 140,000 Twitter followers on Jan. 22.

The petition is open to signatures until May 17, 2016.

All supporters must be citizens of Canada and provide their name, email address, country and telephone number. There is no minimum age requirement.

Once the petition is closed, the Clerk of Petitions will inspect and validate the signatures, the government website says.

As long as 500 valid signatures are present, the clerk will forward Davies a certificate, which can be presented in the House of Commons.

The government will then have 45 days to give a response.

With files from CTV Vancouver