While Democrats living outside the U.S. are closely watching the race between presidential hopefuls Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders, they'll still have a chance to cast ballots for their preferred candidates during the Super Tuesday primary elections.

The organization Democrats Abroad is setting up voting stations in more than 40 countries today, including Canada.

Two American citizens living in Toronto spoke to CTV's Canada AM to talk about who they're supporting, and what they think about the presidential race so far.

Bennett Moase, a dual citizen, said he's supporting Hillary Clinton because of her wide breadth of experience.

Clinton has worked as a lawyer, served as the former first lady, was a senator for New York, and served as secretary of state from 2009 to 2013.

Her wide-ranging presidential campaign pledges to raise incomes for the middle-class, reduce students' debt burden, strengthen gun laws, and work on comprehensive immigration reform. 

Moase said he believes Clinton is the ideal person to continue building on the work accomplished by President Barack Obama.

"Hillary is the best candidate to continue the advances and the achievements of the Obama administration," he said.

John Martin, a permanent resident living in Canada, said while he respects Clinton, he feels more drawn to the campaign Sanders has mounted.

"I like Hillary, but I love Bernie," he said.

Martin said the 74-year-old Senator from Vermont has instilled a real "progressive voice" in the party, and has opened up a "really good" dialogue for Democrats moving forward.

Sanders has campaigned on a platform that focuses on wealth re-distribution and income inequality, getting corporate and special interests out of the political system, and reducing students' debt burden. 

At first seen as a longshot against Clinton, Sanders has surprised critics by staying competitive in the race, even winning the New Hampshire primary.

Both Martin and Moase agree that this year's race, in which Donald Trump leads the Republican candidates, has been more polarized than past presidential campaigns.

"It's definitely more interesting," Martin said, noting the divisive tone of the rhetoric. "People are becoming more conservative. And, with the Bernie supporters, (they're also) becoming more progressive. I don't think that's a bad thing."

Moase said no matter who you support, it’s important to get out and vote.

He noted that there have been past electoral races where voters from abroad helped decide the winner.

“We have a lot of American citizens here in Canada who vote from abroad, and every vote does count,” he said. “I’ve always voted in U.S. elections, and I think it’s an important right that I have that I exercise on a regular basis.”